• The Case of the Missing Drag Queen

    Broke, saddled with a mountain of debt, and dependent on his Aunt Callie’s support, aspiring writer Luke Tanner has returned to Kentucky to put his life back together after a failed five-year relationship. On his twenty-fifth birthday, Luke meets diminutive Pixie Wilder, a long-time performer at the Gilded Lily. After headliner Ruby Dubonnet doesn’t show up, Pixie takes her place as the star of the show—a motive that makes her a suspect in Ruby’s disappearance. Luke reluctantly agrees to help his new-found friend clear her name. He and Pixie set out to find the missing drag queen, and in the process, put themselves in danger.

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  • Aucune Bonne Action

    La veille de Noël, en 1966, Philip Potter, un conservateur du Smithsonian au grand cœur, termine ses achats de dernière minute. Au même instant, James, son compagnon depuis plusieurs années, s’ôte la vie chez eux. Inconscient de ce qui l’attend, Philip dépose des cadeaux à un refuge pour sans-abris, un acte généreux qui fera plus tard de lui un suspect dans le meurtre d’un prostitué. Après la mort choquante de James, deux hommes entrent dans la vie de Philip… et tous deux conduisent une Continental jaune. L’un d’eux, toutefois, est un tueur avec le sang de six prostitués sur les mains. Et tous deux cachent quelque chose. Comme Philip est sur le point de le découvrir, aucune bonne action ne …

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  • Equality: What Do You Think about When You Think of Equality?

    In the tradition of Dr. Martin Luther King’s Stride Toward Freedom and Malala Yousafzai’s, I Am Malala, Equality: What Do You Think About When You Think of Equality? presents thought-provoking and compelling personal essays that probe a concept professed to be the very foundation of our democracy—a concept that may even be more vital today than in the past. From international bestselling author, Anne Perry who asserts we must look within ourselves to our emotions, experiences, and beliefs before we attempt an honest and truthful answer, to Dennis Palumbo, psychotherapist and author, who claims diagnostic labels used in treating mental illness often stigmatize and dehumanize the patient causing clinicians to view their patients in terms of their diagnosis rather than …

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  • No Good Deed

    On Christmas Eve in 1966, Philip Potter, a kind-hearted Smithsonian curator,  wraps up his last-minute shopping. Meanwhile, his lover of several years takes his own life back in their home. Unaware of what awaits him, Philip drops off gifts at a homeless shelter, an act of generosity that will later make him a suspect in the murder of a male prostitute. Following James’s shocking death, two men enter Philip’s life—and both drive yellow Continentals. One of them, though, is a killer, with the blood of at least six hustlers on his hands. And both are hiding something. As Philip is about to discover, no good deed goes unpunished. (Originally released by MLR Press in 2013 as After Christmas Eve)

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  • Whippersnapper

    Tellumo Magnamater is a fresh-out-of-college, first-year English teacher at Salt Lick County High School in Kentucky. He rides the bus to and from work, and every day he walks to the gym behind his small efficiency apartment to exercise. Perhaps because of being raised by two lesbians, Tellumo is attracted to older men. He sets his sights on fifty-something available bachelor Oliver Crumbly. But Tellumo isn’t the only resident interested in Oliver. Peggy Tucker, a widow approaching her sixtieth birthday, is determined to marry again, and she thinks Oliver is her perfect match. Despite Tellumo and Peggy striking up a friendship at the gym, neither realizes they are interested in the same man. But the joke might be on both of …

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  • Happy Independence Day

    Terrence Bottom wants to change the world. Little does he know the world is already changing, and his part in it won’t be what he expects. A prelaw student at Columbia University, Terrence’s interests range from opposing the draft and the war in Vietnam, to civil rights for gays, to anything to do with Cameron McKenzie, the rugged blond hanging around the Stonewall Inn. Too bad Cameron bolts whenever Terrence looks his way. College dropout Cameron McKenzie left tiny Paris, Kentucky with dreams of a career on Broadway. Although he claims to be straight, he prostitutes himself to survive. Now the Mafia is using him to entrap men for extortion schemes. He’s in over his head with no way out—at …

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  • The Bear King of Snowbird Mountain

    Recently single Jeremy Jenkins is an average guy working hard as a landscape designer in the mountains of Tennessee. At a conference in DC, he meets gorgeous Donald Matthews, who says the strangest things—like how he thinks Jeremy is hot and wants them to spend the rest of their lives together. This story is part of A Taste of Honey, a Dreamspinner Press Anthology. Other stories in the collection: The Bear Fetish, by John Amory The Bear Next Door, by Jack Byrne The Bear at the Bar, by J. Scott Coatsworth Barefoot, by Lillian Francis Just Breath, by John Genest Bear Chasing, by Renae Kaye Golden Bear, by G. P. Keith Hunting Bear: A Fairy Tale with a Very Hairy …

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  • Until Thanksgiving

    Josh Freeman knows his best days are behind him. After his partner of seventeen years has an affair with a younger man, Josh buries himself in takeout boxes, half-smoked joints, and self-pity until his best friend gently kicks him in the ass and encourages him to try out a new job in Washington DC—at least until Thanksgiving. Though DC has its share of troubles, specifically in the form of a murderer targeting gay men, Josh soon discovers its charms as well. Unlike his old home, DC is crawling with men who want to date him—apparently he’s not as overweight, out of shape, or over the hill as the man he once loved made him believe. In particular, Josh would love …

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The Crotchety Old Man

Feb 09, 2013
By Michael Rupured
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Bitten by the Garden Bug

When my first ex and I moved into a duplex back in the late 1980s, the yard wasn’t even a factor in our search. The previous tenant must have had a big dog or two, as the fenced in back yard was more mud than grass–especially the perimeter. I planted a few impatiens around the patio and tossed flower seed, purchased for ten cents a pack from the Ben Franklin Five and Dime store, along the inside of the fence. By summer’s end, I was hooked on gardening. The realtor who helped me find my first home said I bought the yard I wanted and took the house that came with it. For my first Georgia residence, I focused more …

Feb 06, 2013
By Michael Rupured
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Hello New Me!

The year I turned fifty, my health went down the toilet. My colonoscopy turned up a precancerous lesion that required surgery, but fortunately, needed no chemotherapy or radiation. The retina specialist diagnosed my advanced macular degeneration, and I was in and out of the dermatologist’s office with numerous skin problems. The last straw was finding out I was borderline diabetic because of the weight I’d gained. The cancer scare and the macular degeneration were upsetting. Perhaps because it was the last of the run of bad health news I got, the diabetes sent me over the edge. I spent several days crying about the shape I was in. That so many things turned up at the same time was a …

Feb 02, 2013
By Michael Rupured
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My New Normal: Part Deux

I’m a grown-assed man and a creature of habit. Having never had a wife or children, I’m also used to having things my way. Yes, I’m more than a little set in my ways and interfering, as any of my ex-lovers will tell you, is ill-advised. For all kinds of reasons, changing my morning routine–the subject of My New Normal: Part One (posted January 13)–requires an act of Congress. Even if I wanted to change, getting a bill through the House and the Senate isn’t going to happen. So I’m stuck with what I’ve got which is just fine by me. After the restructuring I no longer had someone to cook for me, do all the shopping, and take care of …

Jan 31, 2013
By Michael Rupured

Writing Update

Things are finally settling into something I’m calling my new normal. My kitchen table is down to just three piles–a stack of clothes that need to go to the dry cleaner, a reminder from my realtor that I need to get downtown to file the homestead exemption for my new house, and the stack of documents needed for my tax return. A stack-free table is within my grasp for the first time since I moved. Preparations for my first public appearance as a romance novelist last week kept me busy. I had to go downtown to the zoning board and get permission to operate a business (Michael Rupured, Author) out of my home. Then I took the paper they gave …

Jan 27, 2013
By Michael Rupured
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Dereliction of Duties: Seven Excuses

My new normal is crazy busy. I thought the situation was temporary. For months I’ve believed that things would slow down once I got over the next hump. Being a slow learner, it took me more than a year to figure out that busy is here to stay. Reading and commenting on the blogs I’ve followed, for years in some cases, has been a casualty of my new normal. Sweet Manty67 over at Him, Her and Us gave my blog the Liebster Award and the Beautiful Blogger Award back in early December.  Thank you so much! Being picked from among so many great blogs by anyone is an honor, and I’m embarrassed that it has taken me so long to …

Jan 25, 2013
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Tali Spencer: Dangerous Beauty

Building a Character: Family and Faith Thank you, Michael, for letting me visit today to talk about something near and dear to me: building solid characters. I like to start with what they believe in or hold dear. All of us have built our lives upon something. When I created the character of Endre for my fantasy novel, Dangerous Beauty, I wanted to write about a certain kind of man: young, privileged, idealistic, completely devoted to his family, and a firm believer in his god. Endre challenges a great many things about his world—whether the earth is at its center, if mathematics can unravel the mysteries of the stars, if common men and women are not indeed the equals of …
Jan 23, 2013
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M.A. Church: Perfect

It’s indeed a pleasure to welcome my good friend, M.A. Church to talk about her new release, Perfect. With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, it’s not too soon to talk about Cupid and matters of the heart–as only she can do! What if the gods walk among us? Cupid (Latin, cupido, meaning “desire”) in Roman mythology is the god of desire, affection, and erotic love. His Greek counterpart is Eros, but Cupid is also known in Latin as Amor (“Love”). Many names for one person, right? Eros appears in Classical Greek art as a young-looking, slender-winged youth who is often depicted as being mischievous, but during the Hellenistic period he’s increasingly portrayed as a chubby boy. It was during …
Jan 22, 2013
By Michael Rupured

The Way We Were

Some of you probably remember the way things were before the Internet made anyone with a Smartphone or a computer a know-it-all. Okay, who am I kidding? Nobody much under forty reads my blog. As memory loss is far more likely to be an issue, let me remind you. When a question came up, we would often spend hours arguing about the answer. One camp would swear on everything sacred that Movie A had been made before Movie B, and that so-and-so was in both films but Kevin Bacon was not.  Everyone staked out varying and usually conflicting opinions on the subject. If it went that far, somebody called Aunt Gertrude because she adores Kevin Bacon and was old enough to …

Jan 20, 2013
By Michael Rupured

The Longest Month

January is my least favorite month. In fact, I’d go so far as to say I detest the first 31 days of the year. How do I hate thee? Let me count the ways. Let’s start with the temperature. Here in Athens, January is the coldest month of the year. The average high is 54, and the average low is 33. Not even freezing. We’ve had quite a few days with highs in the upper 60s and into the 70s this year, which helps…some. Even if what we call cold might be considered downright balmy elsewhere, I still hate it. Then there’s the weather. Snow and ice are rare enough that even the threat of it is a major news event. Instead …

Jan 13, 2013
By Michael Rupured
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My New Normal: Part One

Now that the holiday season is over and the dust has settled from moving, my new normal has arrived. Routines are still evolving and will change somewhat with the seasons, of course. But the outlines and patterns are clear. Whether I have to work or not, I’m almost always up by 5:30. In the past, I blamed my early waking on my ex getting up to go to the gym. I still say it’s his fault I developed the habit, though in truth, I’ve been an early riser for decades. Toodles waits in the bed, wagging her tail, while I stumble into the bathroom to weigh myself and throw on some clothes. She doesn’t have a choice–she’s too little to …

Jan 11, 2013
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Secret Chemistry by Chris T. Kat

Michael, thank you very much for having me back on your blog. Congrats on the release of your novel Until Thanksgiving—which made DSP’s bestseller list—again! My new novel Secret Chemistry released today. Buy it here. It’s an m/m shape-shifter romance, which lead me to think about the topic of shape-shifter. Shape-shifting means one (or more) humans have the ability to shift into an animal. The most popular animal is the werewolf but there are other animals that have been used; like dragons for example. The Harry Potter series has animagi—people who have the ability to transform into an ability—as well as the fantastic Belgariad series by David Eddings. For Secret Chemistry I chose the well-used trope of werewolves. I’m aware there are …
Jan 08, 2013
By Michael Rupured

Happy New Year!

In the spirit of out with the old and in with the new, I changed the lay-out and design of my blog. The set-up is different. To see the rest of this post, you need to click on “read now” below and to the right of “Happy New Year!” Obviously, this is for folks who follow the link from Facebook. The rest of you must have figured it out, or maybe you waited until I did another post and this one showed up on the list of previous posts below it. However you found it, I’m glad you’re here. Hard to believe we’re already more than a week into 2013 and I’m just now writing my first blog post of …

Dec 30, 2012
By Michael Rupured

My Next Project

As a university employee, I’ve been off the week between Christmas and New Year’s since the mid-1980s. Depending on where the holidays fall, I usually add a few days to one end or the other to extend the break even longer. It’s never enough time off, and it always goes by too fast. In the early days I’d make a list of projects to complete during the extra time off. This just made the time go by even faster and left me feeling disappointed because I didn’t get everything done. The solution was easy enough. I quit making lists. This year, to increase the value of a much-needed break, I opted out of almost everything about Christmas. I sent cards …

Dec 29, 2012
By Michael Rupured

In My Wildest Dreams

Getting my first novel published was a huge accomplishment. That Dreamspinner Press would publish paperbacks in a genre dominated by e-publishers was an added bonus. I’d never become a household name, but at least I’d have a book to autograph for my friends. To temper my expectations as the release date drew near, I kept telling myself that I’m in this for the long haul. Thanks to my day job, I don’t need the income to pay my bills. No big deal if nobody buys my book. At least it’s out there, and that’s an important first step. Building up a base of readers takes time. Shortly after it was released, Until Thanksgiving broke into the top 25 on Amazon’s …

Dec 28, 2012
By Michael Rupured
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The Longest Night

Winter is my least favorite time of year. I hate cold weather, and the shorter days trigger my Seasonal Affective Disorder. Throw in all the holidays that revolve around food and a tendency to carb-load, and the biggest gift I get every year is an extra twenty pounds–or more–that I spend the next twelve months trying to shed. Moving to Georgia helped. Mild winters make it possible to get out in the sun more, and that really makes a difference with the SAD. But I’d still gain too much weight over the winter. Something had to change. And since winter and shorter days weren’t going anywhere (absent climate change), it was up to me. Last year, after losing a lot …