• The Case of the Missing Drag Queen

    Broke, saddled with a mountain of debt, and dependent on his Aunt Callie’s support, aspiring writer Luke Tanner has returned to Kentucky to put his life back together after a failed five-year relationship. On his twenty-fifth birthday, Luke meets diminutive Pixie Wilder, a long-time performer at the Gilded Lily. After headliner Ruby Dubonnet doesn’t show up, Pixie takes her place as the star of the show—a motive that makes her a suspect in Ruby’s disappearance. Luke reluctantly agrees to help his new-found friend clear her name. He and Pixie set out to find the missing drag queen, and in the process, put themselves in danger.

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  • Aucune Bonne Action

    La veille de Noël, en 1966, Philip Potter, un conservateur du Smithsonian au grand cœur, termine ses achats de dernière minute. Au même instant, James, son compagnon depuis plusieurs années, s’ôte la vie chez eux. Inconscient de ce qui l’attend, Philip dépose des cadeaux à un refuge pour sans-abris, un acte généreux qui fera plus tard de lui un suspect dans le meurtre d’un prostitué. Après la mort choquante de James, deux hommes entrent dans la vie de Philip… et tous deux conduisent une Continental jaune. L’un d’eux, toutefois, est un tueur avec le sang de six prostitués sur les mains. Et tous deux cachent quelque chose. Comme Philip est sur le point de le découvrir, aucune bonne action ne …

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  • Equality: What Do You Think about When You Think of Equality?

    In the tradition of Dr. Martin Luther King’s Stride Toward Freedom and Malala Yousafzai’s, I Am Malala, Equality: What Do You Think About When You Think of Equality? presents thought-provoking and compelling personal essays that probe a concept professed to be the very foundation of our democracy—a concept that may even be more vital today than in the past. From international bestselling author, Anne Perry who asserts we must look within ourselves to our emotions, experiences, and beliefs before we attempt an honest and truthful answer, to Dennis Palumbo, psychotherapist and author, who claims diagnostic labels used in treating mental illness often stigmatize and dehumanize the patient causing clinicians to view their patients in terms of their diagnosis rather than …

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  • No Good Deed

    On Christmas Eve in 1966, Philip Potter, a kind-hearted Smithsonian curator,  wraps up his last-minute shopping. Meanwhile, his lover of several years takes his own life back in their home. Unaware of what awaits him, Philip drops off gifts at a homeless shelter, an act of generosity that will later make him a suspect in the murder of a male prostitute. Following James’s shocking death, two men enter Philip’s life—and both drive yellow Continentals. One of them, though, is a killer, with the blood of at least six hustlers on his hands. And both are hiding something. As Philip is about to discover, no good deed goes unpunished. (Originally released by MLR Press in 2013 as After Christmas Eve)

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  • Whippersnapper

    Tellumo Magnamater is a fresh-out-of-college, first-year English teacher at Salt Lick County High School in Kentucky. He rides the bus to and from work, and every day he walks to the gym behind his small efficiency apartment to exercise. Perhaps because of being raised by two lesbians, Tellumo is attracted to older men. He sets his sights on fifty-something available bachelor Oliver Crumbly. But Tellumo isn’t the only resident interested in Oliver. Peggy Tucker, a widow approaching her sixtieth birthday, is determined to marry again, and she thinks Oliver is her perfect match. Despite Tellumo and Peggy striking up a friendship at the gym, neither realizes they are interested in the same man. But the joke might be on both of …

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  • Happy Independence Day

    Terrence Bottom wants to change the world. Little does he know the world is already changing, and his part in it won’t be what he expects. A prelaw student at Columbia University, Terrence’s interests range from opposing the draft and the war in Vietnam, to civil rights for gays, to anything to do with Cameron McKenzie, the rugged blond hanging around the Stonewall Inn. Too bad Cameron bolts whenever Terrence looks his way. College dropout Cameron McKenzie left tiny Paris, Kentucky with dreams of a career on Broadway. Although he claims to be straight, he prostitutes himself to survive. Now the Mafia is using him to entrap men for extortion schemes. He’s in over his head with no way out—at …

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  • The Bear King of Snowbird Mountain

    Recently single Jeremy Jenkins is an average guy working hard as a landscape designer in the mountains of Tennessee. At a conference in DC, he meets gorgeous Donald Matthews, who says the strangest things—like how he thinks Jeremy is hot and wants them to spend the rest of their lives together. This story is part of A Taste of Honey, a Dreamspinner Press Anthology. Other stories in the collection: The Bear Fetish, by John Amory The Bear Next Door, by Jack Byrne The Bear at the Bar, by J. Scott Coatsworth Barefoot, by Lillian Francis Just Breath, by John Genest Bear Chasing, by Renae Kaye Golden Bear, by G. P. Keith Hunting Bear: A Fairy Tale with a Very Hairy …

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  • Until Thanksgiving

    Josh Freeman knows his best days are behind him. After his partner of seventeen years has an affair with a younger man, Josh buries himself in takeout boxes, half-smoked joints, and self-pity until his best friend gently kicks him in the ass and encourages him to try out a new job in Washington DC—at least until Thanksgiving. Though DC has its share of troubles, specifically in the form of a murderer targeting gay men, Josh soon discovers its charms as well. Unlike his old home, DC is crawling with men who want to date him—apparently he’s not as overweight, out of shape, or over the hill as the man he once loved made him believe. In particular, Josh would love …

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The Crotchety Old Man

Feb 20, 2014
By G. A. Hauser
Snapped Blog Tour

Snapped

Goldilocks and the Three Books Making it just right… Any writer who enjoys their craft tries to mix enough mystery, action, emotion, suspense, and of course, depending on the genre, sex, into their novels. There are some readers who like it hot- like porn- ‘gimme more sex! No! I said more sex!! MORE!’ Others, quite the opposite. ‘…sheesh, there was nothing but sex in this book- no plot…just sex, sex, sex- BORING!’ Some readers prefer high drama. ‘Kill him!! Kidnap him! Beat the heck out of him! Oh come on! No one got hurt? THIS SUCKS!’ Of course the savvy writer, who writes for their readers alone- will carve a niche and stick there. Boldly they will announce, “I am …
Feb 17, 2014
By Michael Rupured

Power of Love Contest Winners

Thanks to everyone who commented on my post for the Power of Love blog tour. A total of 13 commenters means I’m giving away an autographed copy of either of my books to three lucky winners. The winners are: Erik, Marsh10, and bn100. Thanks again to everyone who commented and to Julie Lynne Hayes and M.A. Church for organizing the Power of Love Blog Hop.

Feb 17, 2014
By Michael Rupured

Pet Writing Peeves: Adverbs

Adverbs top the list of my Pet Writing Peeves. These little words modify actions and usually end in -ly. They’re perfectly acceptable in lots of different situations, but should be used sparingly in novels. Paragraphs riddled with -ly words — like the one above — are fine in blog posts, status updates, conversations, tweets, news stories, and lots of other places. The occasional use in novels — especially in dialogue — isn’t a big issue with me either. But lots of adverbs in the narration are an indicator of lazy writing. A novel is supposed to show the story, not tell. Adverbs are tell words. They’re fine in conversation and in dialogue because talking is all about telling another person …

Feb 14, 2014
By Michael Rupured

The Secret Lives of 20th Century Gays

Thanks so much to pals Julie Lynn Hayes and M.A. Church for organizing The Power of Love blog tour. Click here for links to all the participating blogs. All the authors are giving something away, so you’ll want to visit all of the participating blogs to see what to do for a chance to win free stuff. For every five commenters on my blog, I’m giving away an autographed copy of Until Thanksgiving or After Christmas Eve. For a chance to win (U.S. residents only), comment on this post by midnight, February 16, 2014. Please note, comments are moderated, so if you haven’t commented on my blog before, your comment may not appear right away. Include an email address so I …

Feb 13, 2014
By F.E. Feeley

Objects in the Rearview Mirror

F.E. Feeley Jr was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan and lived there for twenty years before joining the military. He is a veteran of the US Armed Services; having done a tour in support of Operation Iraq Freedom in 2002-2003, he turned college student, pursuing a degree in political science. He now lives in Southeast Texas where he is engaged to the love of his life, John, and where they raise their 1½ year old German shepherd, Kaiser.

As a young man, reading took center stage in his life,...

Feb 10, 2014
By Michael Rupured

Coming Soon: Happy Independence Day

Back in July of 2013, I started working on Happy Independence Day, my third novel. The idea was to place several of the characters from After Christmas Eve in New York City for the 1969 Stonewall Riots — the beginning of gay liberation and a turning point for gay and lesbian Americans. Seven months later — at 10 a.m. on January 20, 2014 to be exact — I finished writing the story. Writing Until Thanksgiving — at all — was a huge challenge. Creating characters, developing a plot, and writing dialogue were new to me. I had to learn about stakes and tension (a reason to keep readers turning the page), and showing instead of telling. Getting a contract and …

Feb 06, 2014
By Jay Jordan Hawke

Pukawiss the Outcast

In my recently released novel, “Pukawiss the Outcast,” the lead protagonist, Joshua, is a 14-year-old, Ojibwe Indian, and he is coming to terms with the fact that he is gay. The Ojibwe have a long tradition of respect and reverence for gay people, or “two spirits” as they are known today. Western cultures tend to demonize and fear that which is different. Native American traditions, on the other hand, tended to honor those differences, believing that God singled out some people for a particular reason. As Walter L. Williams put in The Spirit and the Flesh: “If a person is different from the average individual, this means that the spirits must have taken particular care in creating that person. If …
Feb 03, 2014
By Michael Rupured
Comments Off on OMG Scarlett! Snow! In Atlanta!

OMG Scarlett! Snow! In Atlanta!

Last week, the mess in Atlanta from the big winter storm caught the nation’s attention. All the finger pointing suggests someone here in Georgia caused all the problems. I hope they find the bastard. I got stuck in Savannah, my favorite city in the US. I probably could have driven home on schedule Wednesday afternoon without any trouble. But most of the trip is on a two-lane highway, and information about road conditions in rural Georgia was hard to come by. So I decided better safe than sorry and stayed put. Snow disasters are inevitable here in Georgia — no matter what anyone does ahead of time — especially in and around Atlanta. Had I sat in my car on the interstate for …

Jan 30, 2014
By M.A. Church

Wrapped in Leather

Fear can be a potent aphrodisiac. ~ Kele Moon The distinct smell of leather has many traits. It can evoke memories of the best moments in life. Scent is a well-known trigger for memory. Leather can also be soft, yet exciting. Enticing. The richness of its scent can tease the senses, drawing out primitive reactions. The smell is alluring, beguiling. The strength of leather, the comfort it offers by its proximity to the body, can be reassuring, even while shivers erupt along the skin as it wraps around a wrist, ankle, or neck. Need floods the body as thick cuffs are secured, triggering that sense of helplessness and immobility. Leather can excite… being so natural, and again, so very sensual. …
Jan 27, 2014
By Michael Rupured
Comments Off on The Advantages of a Treadmill

The Advantages of a Treadmill

I’ve never been a fan of the treadmill. But as much as I hate the confounded torture device, I hate not running more. So I finally forced myself to adjust. Since then, I’ve come to see a few advantages a treadmill offers. Weather excuses disappear. I don’t like to run when it’s too hot, too cold, too windy, not windy enough, or raining. That rules out most days, especially in January, February and March. I can run on the treadmill year round. Fewer scheduling conflicts. Starting in May and continuing well into September, if I haven’t run by ten in the morning, because of the heat, it ain’t happening. By the time it cools off enough in the evening, it’s …

Jan 23, 2014
By Jana Denardo

Kept Tears

I always knew I would write a book like Kept Tears, or at the very least one with a disabled veteran. Many moons ago, I had planned to pay for medical school by going into the military. Most of my family was military in WWII and Viet Nam era service. I wanted to be Air Force. Things didn’t quite work out that way. However, in medical school and in my residency, I did work at several Veteran Administration hospitals and clinics across the country. I loved working with the veterans. In the latest twist my life has taken, I’m still very active with working with veterans on campus and with our local V.A.. While I wanted to do a story …
Jan 20, 2014
By Michael Rupured

The Treadmill and Me

I’ve gained ten pounds in the last few weeks. Why? A deep and abiding affection for Simply Lemonade, Nabisco Ginger Snaps, and ice-cream (any brand will do) had nothing to do with the extra weight. I blame cold weather. Why? Because I’m a fair weather runner. I love running shirtless, and that requires sunshine, temperatures in the 60s or 70s, and a little breeze. For most of last year, I ran three miles or more, two or three times every week, logging more than 330 miles in 94 sessions on MapMyRun. Cold weather has decimated my running routine. Never mind the weight gain. The big surprise is how much I miss running. So I had a little talk with myself. Somehow, …

Jan 16, 2014
By Etienne

About a Bottoms Series

My name is Etienne, and I’ve written several books in the M/M contemporary genre.  They are not, however, romance novels.  At least, not in the generally accepted sense of the term.  I don’t write purple prose, or for that matter, even semi-purple prose.  Why?  Because people don’t talk like that in real life—maybe in Victorian times, but not today.  My literary world is populated by men who act—and react—like men. Enter Chris Bottoms.  He is an RNFA (Registered Nurse First Assistant), which means he works in the OR, assisting surgeons at a somewhat higher level than surgical nurses.  Chris is also a bottom, but not by choice.  He’s a bottom because, between the ages of twelve and fifteen he was …
Jan 13, 2014
By Michael Rupured
Comments Off on On Becoming a Gym Rat: Revisited

On Becoming a Gym Rat: Revisited

January is the month for resolutions, and for lots of people, getting more exercise tops the list. We year-round gym rats see the influx of new faces every January. Some will stick around, but in a matter of weeks, most will give up and quit coming. Read on if you want to be around next year to make fun of the resolvers. I joined a gym about two and a half years ago when paying by the class for Zumba got expensive. To make sure I’d use my membership, I signed up for the most expensive option. My plan came with a weekly 30-minute session with a trainer — great for me, as I hadn’t set foot in a gym …

Jan 09, 2014
By Christopher Hawthorne Moss

Beloved Pilgrim

Excerpt from BELOVED PILGRIM by Christopher Hawthorne Moss, release date January 23, 2014, from Harmony Ink Press